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Discussion in 'Old Amaravathi' started by satish, Sep 14, 2015.

  1. Feb 6, 2016

    satish

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    Ministry approves Rs.7.36 cr for Heritage Park in Amaravati

    Ministry of Urban Development on Friday approved projects worth over Rs.12 cr for improving tourist infrastructure in heritage places of Amaravati in Andhra Pradesh and Warangal in Telangana. An inter-Ministerial HRIDAY National Empowered Committee approved development of a Heritage Park in Amaravati besides developmental works at 1000 Pillar Temple and Kazipet Durgah and rejuvenation of pond at Padmakshi Temple in Warangal city.

    In Amaravati, Heritage Park will be developed over an area of 3.50 acres opposite Dhyan Buddha Statue at a total cost of Rs.7.36 cr. This Park will have an Exhibition Complex with 4 halls to be developed at a cost of Rs.92 lakhs, 22 statues at a cost of Rs. 2 cr, over 20 shops at a cost of over Rs.1.00 cr, 4 food courts at a cost of Rs.95 lakhs, parking area at a cost of Rs.60 lakhs, pathways at a cost of Rs.44 lakhs and landscaping will be done at a cost of Rs.76 lakhs. Other facilities to be provided include seating benches, pargolas etc.

    Exhibition Halls and shops will be used to promote to local art and handicrafts and other products.

    For Warangal, an expenditure of Rs. 4.85 cr has been approved for undertaking development works at 1000 Pillar Temple at a cost of Rs.94 lakhs, at Kazipet Durgah at a cost of Rs.1.78 cr and rejuvenation of pond at Padmakshi Temple with an investment of Rs.2.13 cr.

    At the 1000 Pillar Temple, illumination works will be taken up at a cost of Rs.28 lakhs, development of parking area at a cost of Rs.27 lakhs, e-toilets at a cost of Rs.16 lakhs, landscaping at a cost of Rs.9 lakhs. Other facilities to be provided are-seating spaces, Information signages, solar lightings, dustbins etc.

    Keeping in view the tradition of cooking food at the Kazipet dargah, a doromitory will be developed at a cost of Rs.60 lakhs and a kitchen at a cost ofRs.22 lakhs. Other facilities to be provided are –toilets –Rs.26 lakhs, parking –Rs.13 lakhs, pavements-Rs.18 lakhs, illumination-Rs.13 lakhs.

    For rejuvenation of pond at Padmakshi Temple, civil works including approach road will be taken up at a cost of Rs.1.00 cr, toilets –Rs.26 lakhs, illumination-Rs.22 lakhs, landscaping –Rs.20 lakhs, paving-Rs.11 lakhs and parking facilities at a cost of Rs.11 lakhs. Facilities like seating spaces, information signages and dustbins will also be provided.

    Amaravati and Warangal are among the 12 cities included in the Heritage Development and Augmentation Yojana (HRIDAY) for improving the social, cultural and economic ecosystems by augmenting necessary infrastructure with the objective of conserving the rich cultural heritage and enabling better facilities for tourists and pilgrims. More projects will be approved for Amaravati and Warangal in the near future.

    source:http://www.odishanewsinsight.com/br...es-rs-7-36-cr-for-heritage-park-in-amaravati/
     
  2. Mar 2, 2016

    satish

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  3. Mar 28, 2016

    satish

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  4. May 18, 2016

    satish

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    1st Century BC Buddhist remains found on hill in Amaravati

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    The Buddhist remains discovered from a hill top at Vaikunthapuram village in Amaravati region.
    A clue given by residents of Vaikunthapuram, located in the capital Amaravati region, led veteran archaeologist E. Siva Nagi Reddy to Buddhist remains of 1st Century BC atop a hill in the village.

    Based on information given by the villagers that a few brickbats and fragments of earthen pots were found atop the hill, Dr. Reddy, who is also CEO of the Cultural Centre of Vijayawada, embarked on a thorough exploration of the area.

    Assisted by village residents Bhogineni Nageswara Rao, Subhakar Medasani and Chaitanya Ravela, he conducted a thorough search on the hill which yielded three mounds studded with brickbats and pottery in red colour. The mounds were formed on huge boulders on which a brick-built stupa was raised.

    “The bricks used in construction of stupas and viharas measured 60x30x8 cm and 58x28x7 cm, invariably belonged to the Satavahana era (1st Century BC). A huge quantity of fragments of terracotta and brick tiles used to cover chaityas and viharas was also found,” explains Dr. Reddy.

    Further excavations revealed that the Buddhist monks relied for drinking water mainly on two tanks spread in an extent of half an acre and two rock-cut cisterns.

    Villagers informed that a few years ago, treasure-hunters dug up at the centre of the stupa and found a relic casket with a gold leaf, which was later handed over to the then Collector of Guntur district.

    “The Buddhist remains like stupas, chaityas and viharas yielded on Vaikunthapuram hill show that Buddhism existence from 1st Century BC to the 5th Century AD, but later the region came under the influence of Saivism in the Vishnukundin era and under Vaishnavites between the 13th and 17th centuries AD. This is evident in the existence of two Venkateswara temples —one at the foot of the hill and another on the hill top,” said Dr. Reddy.

    He said a 1{+s}{+t}Century BC rock-cut cave on the hill top was installed with the idol of Lord Venkateswara during the 17th century AD.

    Villagers said Deepak Joe of Andhra Pradesh State Department of Archaeology had inspected the site some time back.

    Dr. Reddy also stumbled upon two Siva lingas on the Krishna river bed. It appeared that the lingas surfaced recently due to receding of the river water. These Siva lingas, he said, portrayed stylistic ground art of 5th century AD (Vishnukundin era).

    source:http://www.thehindu.com/todays-pape...found-on-hill-in-amaravati/article8613111.ece
     
  5. Jul 7, 2016

    satish

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    Amaravati not yet ready for pushkarams

    With just over a month for the Krishna Pushkaram to begin, the temple town of Amaravati is yet to dust itself. Lakhs of pilgrims are expected to converge on the temple town for the 12-day event, starting August 12.

    Ill-prepared

    Even after the town has been included in the Heritage City Development and Augmentation Yojana (HRIDAY) scheme, under which roads and drains will be developed with the funds given by the Ministry of Urban Development, there has not been much change on the ground.

    The road leading to the temple town resembles a dust bowl. The mounds of gravel on either present a pathetic sight. As one enters the narrow road leading to the 125 feet Dhyana Buddha statue, one is appalled by the lack of a proper approach road.

    The plight of pilgrims will be much worse as there is no provision for toilets at the major tourist site.

    Works relating to the 1.3 km model ghat on the banks of Krishna river are yet to be completed. The Major Irrigation department has entrusted the work to a contractor, who has not stuck to the deadline.

    District Collector Kantilal Dande has put the department on notice, and set a deadline of July 31.

    The APSRTC Bus Station Complex is in a shambles, with broken tiles and no proper approach road.

    “The A.P. government is keen on making brand Amaravati a global symbol, but the local authorities are not willing to put in extra effort,” said Amaravati Development Corporation president Jasti Veeranjaneyulu.


    While work on a model ghat is incomplete, the bus station is a shambles

    http://www.thehindu.com/news/nation...t-yet-ready-for-pushkarams/article8814312.ece
     
  6. Oct 19, 2016

    satish

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    Civic woes brimming in Amaravati town

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    A pigsty constructed in a patch of encroached land just above the Krishnaveni ghat in Amaravati heritage town in Guntur district.

    Pig menace is back; drinking water in short supply; no fire station in the heritage town
    Even as the government is making all-out efforts to retain the old world charm of the Amaravati heritage town, residents here await remedies to fundamental issues that plague their life.

    The ancient town of Amaravati is a village panchayat in Guntur revenue division, located on the banks of the Krishna river. The new capital of Andhra Pradesh has been named after this important historic town which had served as the capital of the Satavahana kingdom in ancient days.

    The recent Krishna Pushkarams brought some of the long-neglected areas into the limelight. Although development projects happened at a remarkably rapid pace at this pilgrim centre only some of the works were completed.

    Post-Pushkarams, the situation has come back to square one, complain the locals.

    The pig menace is back to haunt the local residents. Several spots that had turned breeding ground for pigs were identified and cleared of the animals during Pushkarams. But the pigs are back now, rummaging through garbage strewn at places.

    An encroached patch of land adjacent to Krishnaveni ghat now greets pilgrims visiting for a holy dip with a pigsty. “Half-a-dozen piglets trot around the enclosure with an adult one guarding them all the time,” says Ankam Babu, who works as a mechanic in a local shop.

    Drainage works stopped

    Drainage works started during Pushkarams have been stopped abruptly. “We don’t have drinking water facility. Water pumped at Goranki drinking water plant in Guntur is supplied to us but it is far from adequate. Roads are wide now thanks to Pushkarams but in the absence of speed-breakers speeding vehicles criss-cross posing grave threat to lives. This is because do we not have a traffic police wing here,” says Babu Lal, a member of Amaravati Heritage Society, a civil society formed recently.

    The village panchayat does not have a fire station either. “In the event of a fire mishap, fire tenders are brought either from Guntur, Sattenapalli, Krosur or Mangalagiri, located at a distance of 33 km. A fire station is the need of the hour,” says Babu Lal.

    Women outnumber men in this ancient village. “A women police station will go a long way in solving the problems of the fairer sex. There are no public toilets around and we also need permanent changing rooms at the bathing ghats. This is essential because during the Karthika ‘maasam’ and other auspicious occasions, we have a floating crowd of 25,000-50,000 pilgrims visiting the temple here on a single day,” says Gogineni Vijaya Lakshmi, president of Amaravati Mahila Samithi.

    http://www.thehindu.com/news/cities...brimming-in-amaravati-town/article9237607.ece
     

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